The Rise of the Papacy

March 25, 2013

With the resignation of Pope Benedict and the installation of Pope Francis, the question of how the papacy began is a good one to ask.  Catholics believe that Jesus himself laid the foundation for papal succession when he announced that the church would be built on Peter (Matthew 16:18-19).  Peter, therefore, acting as bishop of Rome, passed down his apostolic authority to his successor.  That successor passed Peter’s authority to the next, and so on down to the election of Jorge Mario Bergoglio two weeks ago.  Bergoglio, taking the name Francis, is the 266th Pope.

“The problem with this explanation,” writes David Wells, “is that there is no evidence to sustain it.”

Well’s brief article is an informative and interesting look at the reality behind the rise of the papacy.  You can read the article here.

(HT: Justin Taylor)

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“I’m disappointed in you” are some of the hardest words we can hear.  Ed Welch writes:

If my wife says, “I am so angry with you,” I can live with that. But if she says, “I’m not angry. I am just disappointed in you,” that is unbearable. I feel like a scolded puppy. My tail goes between my legs, I retreat to the corner, and . . . I feel helpless because I am not sure what I can do to change her opinion. I could ask forgiveness, and she would be quick to forgive, but I would still be left feeling like a disappointment. Forgiveness does not remove disappointment. Maybe I would make vows to do better and spend the rest of the day living out those vows, but it would still be unbearable.

After exploring the problem further, Ed offers a meaningful remedy.  Here’s a hint at his conclusion: “There are no doghouses in the kingdom of God.”

You can read the whole article here.

 

You may be surprised to learn that Martin Luther wrote a preface to the 1543 Latin edition of the Qur’an.  Perhaps even more surprising is that that edition of the Qur’an would likely never have existed except that Luther had argued so persuasively for its publication. Read the rest of this entry »

…but who gets to decide who receives medical attention?

Charles Colson explores our country’s thorny dilemma with health care in this brief article in Christianity Today.  Though he offers no solution, Colson nevertheless raises some important considerations for Christians.

Just read this thought-provoking article by Al Mohler about why Mother’s Day is a bad idea.  Here’s a sample:

Mother’s Day is a bad idea because it subverts the reality of faithful mothering and robs faithful mothers of their true glory.  Mothers deserving of honor are handed cards and taken to lunch, when songs of praise should instead be offered to the glory of God.  Undeserving mothers, who abdicate their true responsibility, are honored just because they are mothers.  Children, young and old, who ignore and dishonor their mothers by word and by life throughout the year, assuage their guilt by making a big deal of Mother’s Day.

Mohler doesn’t suggest that we should do away with Mother’s Day.  Skim the whole article to see what he recommends.  And stay tuned for part two, which is sure to come out next month when Father’s Day rolls around!